In Memory

Edward Hart

Edward Hart

Ed died at age 25 of suicide. He was survived by parents and siblings. Ed was a cross country star at WJ and broke track records that stood for many years. He was extremely intelligent, somewhat shy, played the violin, loved crossword puzzles, and had a wonderful wry sense of humor. He attended Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, for about two years. According to Mary Saloschin Hubbard, his high school girlfriend was Judy Wilson (one of Mary's best friends) and they double dated to the prom.



 
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06/05/09 04:02 PM #1    

Mary Saloschin (Hubbard)

I knew Ed from 7th grade (North Bethesda Jr. High) through WJ and beyond. I had a big crush on him at NB. He played violin well enough to be in the orchestra and was shy, smart and really good looking. He was a track star even in those days. He also smoked -- I remember leaving a concert at NB after the orchestra had performed (perhaps the choruses were singing?) and walking in the NB ball fields, having a cigarette with him. I didn't smoke, so it wasn't that easy -- but I really liked him and wanted to share the experience. Hey, it was a chance to be alone with him for a few minutes!

We were on the brink of being boyfriend/girlfriend in 9th grade (he started a multiplication dance with me. I was beyond thrilled!) when Linda Coon transferred to NB -- she liked Ed and wanted to be his girlfriend, so I backed down. (Linda and I later became good friends).

Ed and I stayed good friends through WJ. When he started dating Judy Wilson, one of my best pals, I was dating Jon Werner. Both guys were track stars, so it was a very nice foursome for awhile in the spring of 1969.

When Ed went to Kenyon College, we exchanged letters for awhile. However, he became depressed and didn't finish college. He visited me at home a few times, and I saw him in a mental health residential center in DC in the early 1970s. I'm not sure if I saw him after that. I moved to Boston in 1973 and found out about his death from my folks, as it was in the paper.

Ed, you were a wonderful friend, a bright and witty young man, and a superb athlete. I think of you often.


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